Live Love Dream

18. Female. Freshman. Fashion. Boys.

reverseracism:

Never forget.

(Source: blackourstory)

ode-to-the-world:

La Mulâtresse Solitude (1772-19 November 1802), was a slave rebel and heroine of the fight against slavery in Guadeloupe.
Originally a slave, she was freed by the abolition of slavery in 1794 during the French revolution. When slavery was reintroduced on Guadeloupe by Napoleon in 1802, she joined Louis Delgrès call to fight for her freedom and took part in the Battle of the 18 May 1802.
She was captured and executed by hanging after being granted to wait out her pregnancy.
Photo

ode-to-the-world:

La Mulâtresse Solitude (1772-19 November 1802), was a slave rebel and heroine of the fight against slavery in Guadeloupe.

Originally a slave, she was freed by the abolition of slavery in 1794 during the French revolution. When slavery was reintroduced on Guadeloupe by Napoleon in 1802, she joined Louis Delgrès call to fight for her freedom and took part in the Battle of the 18 May 1802.

She was captured and executed by hanging after being granted to wait out her pregnancy.

Photo

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

cultureunseen:

Fannie Lou Hammer
October 6, 1917 – March 14, 1977 (age 59)


(When we say that they don’t make them like this Sister anymore, OMG!
Beaten damn near to death by white men in jail, after being detained on a false charge and she still continued to fight!)

(via reverseracism)

krystvega:

Do these elementary schools teach us about the elements ?
Do these Universities teach us about the Universe ?
My ancestors did .
- Kryst Vega

krystvega:

Do these elementary schools teach us about the elements ?

Do these Universities teach us about the Universe ?

My ancestors did .

- Kryst Vega

(Source: thanoblesavage, via bkcarib)

theladybadass:

Rare footage of educator and civil rights leader, Mary McLeod Bethune (circa 1930s, 1940s)

*found in Prelinger Open Archives

(via jerroncouture)

classicladiesofcolor:

The photo source states that this is Victoria Spivey, but this is actually Harlem toe dancer, Honey Brown with director King Vidor and actor/singer, Daniel L. Haynes on the set of Hallelujah! (1929).
Honey Brown was the original choice to play the role of “Chick” in Hallelujah! Many factors contributed to Ms. Brown being replaced by Nina Mae McKinney. You can read about it here in a post by the Hollywood Filmograph (a research site dedicated to Film Restoration).
The post is a lengthy read, but it provides detailed information on the making of the film, gives some insight on what work was like for black performers on an early Hollywood film set, and includes some rare photos. 

I read about this.
Wasn’t it so controversial that he had to hire bodyguards everyday they filmed?

classicladiesofcolor:

The photo source states that this is Victoria Spivey, but this is actually Harlem toe dancer, Honey Brown with director King Vidor and actor/singer, Daniel L. Haynes on the set of Hallelujah! (1929).

Honey Brown was the original choice to play the role of “Chick” in Hallelujah! Many factors contributed to Ms. Brown being replaced by Nina Mae McKinney. You can read about it here in a post by the Hollywood Filmograph (a research site dedicated to Film Restoration).

The post is a lengthy read, but it provides detailed information on the making of the film, gives some insight on what work was like for black performers on an early Hollywood film set, and includes some rare photos. 

I read about this.

Wasn’t it so controversial that he had to hire bodyguards everyday they filmed?

(Source: acertaincinema.com, via howtobeterrell)

beautone:


Colonizability of Africa (1899)
A map by cartographer John George Bartholomew (1860-1920)



I’m going to take the time to type this out, because, you know, holy shit.

The pink: Healthy colonizable Africa, where European races may be expected to become in time the prevailing type, where essentially European states may be formed.
The yellow: Fairly healthy Africa: but where unfavorable conditions of soil or water supply, or the prior establishment of warlike or enlightened native races or other causes, may effectually prevent European colonization.
The gray: Unhealthy but exploitable Africa: impossible for European colonization but for the most part of the great commercial value and inhabited by fairly docile, governable races; the Africa of the trader and planter and of despotic European control
The brown: Extremely unhealthy Africa

I have no words to describe any of this, except to note that this was a genocide that these bastards planned, and carried out, in many many parts.
Next time someone tells you to “just get over it”, it being the European colonization of the world…. show them this. Some things…. you just don’t ever get over. 

It makes me SICK to think we’re supposed to pick up pieces of ourselves and somehow be not-broken, just because there isn’t *visible* presence of the colonizers anymore.

Enlighten yourselves, we are the change it can only come from us.

via fyeahblackhistory, jaded16india, hidingincanada, spatiotemporalcookies

beautone:

Colonizability of Africa (1899)

A map by cartographer John George Bartholomew (1860-1920)

I’m going to take the time to type this out, because, you know, holy shit.

The pink: Healthy colonizable Africa, where European races may be expected to become in time the prevailing type, where essentially European states may be formed.

The yellow: Fairly healthy Africa: but where unfavorable conditions of soil or water supply, or the prior establishment of warlike or enlightened native races or other causes, may effectually prevent European colonization.

The gray: Unhealthy but exploitable Africa: impossible for European colonization but for the most part of the great commercial value and inhabited by fairly docile, governable races; the Africa of the trader and planter and of despotic European control

The brown: Extremely unhealthy Africa

I have no words to describe any of this, except to note that this was a genocide that these bastards planned, and carried out, in many many parts.

Next time someone tells you to “just get over it”, it being the European colonization of the world…. show them this. Some things…. you just don’t ever get over. 

It makes me SICK to think we’re supposed to pick up pieces of ourselves and somehow be not-broken, just because there isn’t *visible* presence of the colonizers anymore.

Enlighten yourselves, we are the change it can only come from us.

via fyeahblackhistoryjaded16indiahidingincanadaspatiotemporalcookies

(via reverseracism)

I just read an account of woman that was tracking down her husband’s killer (he was lynched) to bring him to justice and they burned her, hung her and tore her unborn baby out of her stomach (8 months pregnant) and stomped on it.

WITH A CROWD OF ONLOOKERS.

I’m going to throw my book.

AND IT’S ALWAYS THE SAME DAMN  ”REASON”— even when it’s economic jealousy, even when it’s blacks being whistleblowers, even when it’s about a black woman being raped.

A WHITE WOMAN.

SO SICK OF THIS.

SMH. 

African American History upsets me so much.

It’s the same damn cycle: White people push us to the brink, we go jump off the cliff and then they get mad that we did.

It happened with the Black Exodus, when blacks were being badly treated in the sharecropping and decided to go north and whites got upset that their labor force was leaving and threatened to kill them if they left, despite lynching them anyway.

It happened in WW 1. Because even though the black soldiers were among the hardest working regiments, they were vilified by white soldiers who amplified their failures and told rumors about them in foreign places. And when they went to go enjoy the towns, white men ended up trying to kill them for trying to get a drink of water in a hotel. And when they enjoyed the European freedom, whites had to remind them that this wasn’t to be enjoyed for long.

It happened with the race riots of 1919. Blacks started standing up for themselves because, despite fighting valiantly in the war, white men thought it was disrespectful to have them be so prideful. They were lynched and tarred and burned alive. SO they started standing up for themselves, killing the men who sought to harm black men and especially black women and white people just had to start bombing houses and beating up innocent people who had been walking home from work.

Man, the way I feel, I’m never going to touch a white man in a sexual way again.